Hyperbolic Space online exhibit

- Introduction
- Parallel Postulate
- Poincare Disc Model of Hyperbolic Space
- Physical Models of Hyperbolic Space
- Crochet Models
- Shape of the Universe

Model galleries
- Gallery of Crochet Hyperbolic Models #1 [IFF-G1]
- People's Hyperbolic Gallery #1 [IFF-G4]

Additional institute resources
- Build Your Own Hyperbolic Plane
- Interview with crocheting mathematicians
- Photos from the Kitchen/Cabinet Event
- Photos from the Machine Project Exhibit

Press and other resources
- Interweave Knits article Taking Crochet to a Higher Plane
- The Christian Science Monitor article on Crocheting the Hyperbolic Plane
- Los Angeles Times review of at Machine Project
- New York Times article on Daina Taimina
- NPR interview with mathematicians
- Article from Science magazine about Kitchen event
- Newsday article about Kitchen event and crochet hyperbolics
- Article from The Bangor Daily News about crochet hyperbolics
- Crochet hyperbolics on Future Feeder

Hyperbolic Space

Computer generated model of hyperbolic space by Jeffrey Weeks

We have created a world of rectilinearity. The rooms we inhabit, the skyscrapers we work in, the grid-like arrangement of our streets, the shelves on which we store our possessions, and the freeways we cruise on our daily commute speak to us in straight lines. But what exactly is a straight line? And how do such “objects” relate to one another?

This question, so seemingly trivial, lies at the heart of a conundrum that dates back to the dawn of the Western mathematical tradition. Though seemingly obvious, the property of “straightness” turns out to be a subtle and surprisingly fecund concept. Understanding this quality ultimately led mathematicians to discover a radical new kind of space that had hitherto seemed abhorrent and impossible.

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